decimal points

these are a few of my favorite things.

Wallace Neff was considered a “starchitect” in the 1930s, designing homes for the Hollywood elite.  But he viewed his “Bubble House” his greatest architectural achievement.  At the end of World War Two, the United States was facing a housing shortage.  He designed these 1000 square foot “Bubble Houses” to be built entirely in 48 hours using an airform and gunite pressurized cement application process.  (See more about how they were made here)  

Bubble Houses were ultimately unsuccessful in the United States, because the circular and domed shape made it difficult to find furniture to fit, and wall space wasn’t easy to utilize.  However, these low-cost housing units proved quite popular in other countries, especially in Senegal, where a 1,200 unit colony was built and many still stand today. 

Top photo:  Wallace Neff in front of a bubble house at a construction site.
Bottom photo:  A “Double Bubble House”  

(This post was inspired by the most recent podcast from 99% Invisible.  Many more photos, and a great podcast can be found at their website here)

(via bbook)

nevver:

How to Roll Your Shirt Sleeves
airbnb:

via Alanna + her great little studio on Valencia Street in SF. 

airbnb:

via Alanna + her great little studio on Valencia Street in SF. 

synecdoche:

sweetie, you don’t need someone who’s more fleeting than fall

Best song.

inspiredbyme:

I just fell madly in love with the work of Andrew Geller.

inspiredbyme:

I just fell madly in love with the work of Andrew Geller.

(via bbook)

creativehouses:

Roman Pool, Hearst Castle, CA, USA

creativehouses:

Roman Pool, Hearst Castle, CA, USA

Yup.